• New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance

    While there is a growing market for organic solar cells ­­– they contain materials that are cheaper, more abundant, and more environmentally friendly than those used in typical solar panels – they also tend to be less efficient in converting sunlight to electricity than conventional solar cells. Now, scientists who are members of the Center for Computational Study of Excited-State Phenomena in Read more
  • Know Your Rights

    Arizona law protects individual homeowners’ private property rights to solar access by dissolving any local covenant, restriction or condition attached to a property deed that restricts the use of solar energy. This law sustained a legal challenge in 2000. A Maricopa County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of homeowners in a lawsuit filed by their homeowners association seeking to Read more
  • Home Battery Systems

    Rooftop solar panels are common in Arizona thanks to abundant sunshine, but to get even more use from the technology, homeowners are beginning to pair them with large home batteries. Batteries allow homeowners to store their surplus electricity, rather than send it to the grid in exchange for credit from their electric company. Read more
  • Solar Hot Water

    There are two types of solar water heating systems: active, which have circulating pumps and controls, and passive, which don't. The typical solar water heater is comprised of solar collectors and a well-insulated storage tank. The solar collector is a network of pipes that gathers the sun's energy, transforms its radiation into heat, and then transfers that heat to either Read more
  • Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit

    (Information provided by DSIRE - Last reviewed 02/19/2009) Incentive Type: Personal Tax Credit State: Federal Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies: Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Other Solar Electric Technologies Applicable Sectors: Residential Amount: 30% Maximum Incentive: Solar-electric systems placed in service before 2009: $2,000Solar-electric systems placed in service after 2008: no maximumSolar water heaters placed in service before Read more
  • Solar Building Design in Arizona

    The idea of using the sun to meet the energy needs in our buildings has been with us since the time of the Greeks, with some of the design manifestations even evident in the prehistoric structures of Arizona and the Southwest. There is a great historic tradition for Arizona buildings that utilize our most abundant resource, and the current increases Read more
  • How Not to- Battery Connections

    Photo shows the situation after a battery discharge test at 300 amps was terminated on a 1530 AH IBE battery string when one post melted. During the discharge test all cell voltages are logged. The sum of the cell voltages was 2.73 volts lower than the 48-volt string voltage. This is an average of 118 mv per inter-cell connection, 5-10 Read more
  • 1 New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance
  • 2 Know Your Rights
  • 3 Home Battery Systems
  • 4 Solar Hot Water
  • 5 Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit
  • 6 Solar Building Design in Arizona
  • 7 How Not to- Battery Connections

Blogs

  1. Solar Center Blog
  2. Guest Blogs
Lucy Mason
06 January 2018

Wishing you a wonderful and Happy New Year!

The year 2017 has gone by quickly, and AriSEIA has accomplished a full and active agenda to further solar and renewable energy in Arizona. 

Geoff Sutton
25 November 2017

In the desert south-west the intense sunshine and long summer days result in uncomfortable and even dangerously high temperatures for about four months.


Will add Guest Blog content here
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Featured

Some things to pay attention to in Arizona

None known

 
ASEA REBOOT

The Arizona Solar Energy Association (ASEA), State Chapter of the American Solar Energy Society ASES), will be holding meetings in a follow-up to the-long awaited updated ASES‚  Chapters handbook and directives.

ASES evolution, in response to some problematic economic and operational conditions, has resulted in a hearty and robust context for the present and the future. ASEA is now responding with an appropriate updating, through local and statewide discussion. 

Interim Chair, Andy Gerl, a past ASEA Chair and Board member, is making arrangements for Arizona solar advocates and supporters, members and non-members, to receive both an update re: ASES adaptation and changes, and to discuss solar in Arizona and the “reboot" of the ASEA  context, goals and objectives, within the context of varied renewable energy groups within the State, such as AriSEIA (the solar trade association); various sustainability groups; Green Building organizations; the recently formed solar hot water businesses non-profit entity; research and development at the universities; and others.

For more information about the ASEA Reboot discussions, contact Andy at andrew@blazingsolar.com  or 602-799-5942

This year the American Solar Energy Society is excited to partner with Solar United Neighbors in organizing the 2018 National Solar Tour. A national organization representing the needs and interests of solar owners and supporters, Solar United Neighbors helps people go solar, join together, and fight for their energy rights. Together, ASES and Solar United Neighbors are working to organize the largest national solar tour in history.

There is one remaining open house on the schedule in Arizona: 304 W Coolidge St Phoenix AZ 85013 Saturday, October 20  9:00 AM – 2:00 PM. 

Please RSVP so we know you are coming! http://bit.ly/solaropenhouse-74

Upcoming:



Proposition 127  Constitutional Amendment

Arizona 2018 General Election November 6, 2018

 “Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona Amendment.”

A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AMENDING ARTICLE XV OF THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA TO REQUIRE ELECTRICITY PROVIDERS TO GENERATE AT LEAST 50% OF THEIR ANNUAL SALES OF ELECTRICITY FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

There is a lot to this important Proposition and it will have an important affect on solar in Arizona. Television in Arizona seems to have continuous ads against and for this proposition.  Study the issues and vote in November.

Basically the Proposition will place an annual energy requirement on the Arizona utilities:

  1.  EACH AFFECTED UTILITY SHALL BE REQUIRED TO SATISFY AN ANNUAL RENEWABLE ENERGY REQUIREMENT BY OBTAINING RENEWABLE ENERGY CREDITS FROM ELIGIBLE RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES.
  2.  AN AFFECTED UTILITY’S ANNUAL RENEWABLE ENERGY REQUIREMENT SHALL BE CALCULATED EACH CALENDAR YEAR BY APPLYING THE FOLLOWING APPLICABLE ANNUAL PERCENTAGE TO THE RETAIL KWH SOLD BY THE AFFECTED UTILITY DURING THAT CALENDAR YEAR:


(A) IN 2020 NOT LESS THAN   12%  

(B) IN 2021 NOT LESS THAN   14%

(C) IN 2022 NOT LESS THAN  16%

(D) IN 2023 NOT LESS THAN  20%

(E) IN 2024 NOT LESS THAN 24%

(F) IN 2025 NOT LESS THAN 28%

(G) IN 2026 NOT LESS THAN32%

(H) IN 2027 NOT LESS THAN36%

(I) IN 2028 NOT LESS THAN 40%

(J) IN 2029 NOT LESS THAN 45%

(K) 2030 AND EACH YEAR THEREAFTER NOT LESS THAN 50%

The Proposition and For/Against statements are on the Secretary of State website at:https://azsos.gov/sites/default/files/2018_Publicity_Pamphlet_Final.pdf

ASES Solar 2018

Pathways to the Renewable Energy Transformation
Registration is now open for SOLAR 2018!

Our conference schedule is now online!
"The National Climate Assessment shows the seriousness of climate change for the US and helps frame the future role of solar energy.”
Featured Speaker:
Dr. David Fahey will be presenting the 2017 National Climate Assessment. David is the Director of the Chemical Sciences Division in NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The Division’s mission is to advance scientific understanding of climate change, air quality and stratospheric ozone through research on the chemical and physical processes that affect Earth’s atmospheric composition. He serves the Montreal Protocol as a Co-Chair of its Scientific Assessment Panel on stratospheric ozone depletion. He has authored major assessments on the topics of black carbon and aviation to address their roles in the climate system. 
Visit our conference website to review our recommended travel accommodations, featured events, and membership discounts!
Be sure to join ASES today to receive the best prices
To ensure you receive the discount, log into your ASES account before registering online.
The discount is automatically applied at checkout.

APS Stakeholder announcement Aug 21, 2017

 

Announced 8/21/2017 4:26 PM

Stakeholders,

The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) has approved a decision in our rate review, and we are happy to share some details with you affecting our solar customers. We appreciate your support in delivering this message to customers and will be glad to help you with any questions you may have. For your reference, attached are letters that were sent to customers regarding grandfathering. Other resources are available at aps.com/gosolar.

Grandfathering

  • Current solar customers that are interconnected to the APS grid will remain grandfathered for 20 years from the date of interconnection.
    • The grandfathering stays with the premise. Systems transferred to a new premise will require a new application, and the customer would no longer be eligible for EPR-6.
    • Over the terms of the grandfathering period, a customer may not increase the capacity of their grandfathered solar system by more than a total of 10% or 1 kW, whichever is greater.
  • Customers who submit a complete application by 11:59 p.m. August 31, 2017 will be eligible for grandfathering. The system would need to be installed and have AHJ approval by February 28, 2018 in order to qualify. A complete application includes all of the following:
    • Customer Application
    • Executed Contract
    • Disclaimer
    • Consumer Acknowledgement
    • Installer Application
    • Three Line Diagram
    • Site Plan
  • Future solar customers whose complete application (as noted above) is submitted on or after September 1, 2017 may be eligible for Resource Comparison Proxy (RCP) Export rate. This rate would allow customers to receive a credit for excess energy sent to the grid.

Resource Comparison Proxy (RCP) Export Rate

In addition to the typical requirements, to qualify for RCP the solar system will need to meet the following criteria:

  • Systems over 10 kW DC may not exceed 150% of the customer’s maximum one-hour peak demand over the prior 12 months. (For example, if the customer’s maximum peak demand is 8 kW, then the maximum size system installed would be 12 kW DC.)
  • The nameplate capacity cannot be larger than the following electrical service limits:
    • For 200 Amp service, a maximum of 15 kW DC
    • For 400 Amp service, a maximum of 30 kW DC
    • For 600 Amp service, a maximum of 45 kW DC
    • For 800 Amp service, a maximum of 60 kW DC

Use this link to learn more: Rate Rider RCP

Interconnection Application Checklist

The checklist used to review applications has been revised to include RCP qualification criteria, and is attached for your convenience. Please use this tool to ensure applications meet the qualifications and Interconnection Requirements for expeditious approval.

New Homes

In order to qualify for RCP (see RCP requirements above), customers installing solar systems over 10 kW DC on a newly constructed home that does not have established usage history will need to provide load calculations stamped by an Electrical Professional Engineer in Arizona. These load calculations will need to be uploaded to the application under the document type “New Build Load Calculations”.

Resubmittals After Approval

In order to continue our efforts to streamline the application review process, applications that have new diagrams submitted after approval (i.e. change in equipment and new diagrams are uploaded) will need to be canceled and a new application will be required. The new application will be subject to the rate rider in effect at the time the complete application is submitted. This change is effective immediately. (See below, APS has extended this) Applications with resubmittals prior to today will continue to be manually processed.  

Saver Choice Tech Plan Qualification (Formally known as R-Tech)

The Saver Choice Tech Plan Qualification application will be available online August 22, 2017. Customers interested in this experimental rate can apply if they meet the requirements.

Use this link to learn more: Saver Choice Tech

Solar Water Heater Incentive Program

The Solar Water Heater Incentive Program is now closed. Applications that have already been submitted will remain active.

We appreciate your patience as we process the high volume of applications received over the past several months. We will continue to work with you and answer any questions that may arise during this time of transition.

If you would like more information regarding the rate review decision, please visit azenergyfuture.com.

Sincerely,

APS Renewable Energy Team

 On 8/21/2017 5:35 PM, APS Renewable Energy emailed a revision:

Stakeholders,

We are contacting you again to provide a slight change and clarification regarding resubmittals after approval, which was mentioned in the Stakeholder Communication sent today. Due to feedback and some concern regarding this change, we will be postponing this policy until after the Grandfathering 180 day period is over.

It’s important to know that equipment changes or shortages do not extend the 180 day Grandfathering period.

We appreciate your feedback and flexibility.

Sincerely,

APS Renewable Energy Team

You have received this message from APS because we thought you might be interested in this information. If you don't want to receive these messages, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will remove you from our contact list.   aps.com | 400 N 5 Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004 

 

Net metering is dead. Long live net metering

The must-see panel of Intersolar North America (if you could only see one) discussed the most pressing issue in distributed solar today: What’s happening with net metering – and where does the industry go from here?

At 9 am on Tuesday morning, one of the most important issues in the industry was being debated in a conference room as part of the Intersolar North America trade show: net metering.

Across the nation, net metering policies are changing. The largest solar market, California, has moved to a successor policy, while other states including Hawaii and Indiana have shut the policy down entirely.

But looking beyond the more severe instances, an exploration of different states shows a definite shift in the direction of policies that attempt to put a more precise value on the electricity exported to the grid by distributed solar, along with a move to time-of-use rates. And more often than not the shift is more incremental than a step-change.

The assembled experts attempted to grapple with these big-picture issues, fragmented as they are in the individual experiences of different states.

Read the rest of the article on 

https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2017/07/12/net-metering-is-dead-long-live-net-metering/

Solar Wars Part 1

This is part one of a three-part series discussing “solar wars.” There will be three battles in this war: net-metering, tariff reform, and grid defection. This will have short and long term impacts on the solar industry, and it is expected to drive innovation.

By Bill Ellard, Energy Economist

The net-metering battle has begun, as utilities across the US are lowering the price they are willing to pay for customer-generated electricity from solar. I am predicting a series of solar wars in the near future. They will be mainly between the existing monopoly electric utilities and the solar industry that is involved with behind-the-meter solar installations. Utilities are not against solar, as this new technology gives them another method to meet electricity demand, but what utilities dislike is their customers producing their own electricity by any means such as solar, wind, or other on-site generators. It means customers purchase much less energy from the utilities.

Up until about 2005, the United States was the leader in solar electric installations, but other countries such as Germany have become larger players. As we can see on the graph, solar was not growing much in the US until about 2011-2012.

This surge in solar installations starting in 2011 has created this first solar battle about net-metering. Before 2012 utilities in the USA had no reason to see solar as a threat to them, as the amount of revenue lost to customer self-generation was extremely small. So during this timeframe, utilities did not mind giving customers full retail credit for their excess energy.

Net-metering typically occurs between 10 am and 4 pm when a customer’s solar system is producing more electricity than the onsite loads require: the sun is shining and the occupants are off at work. This “extra” energy is sent back through the utilityowned meter and into the grid; typically, it amounts to about 20-30% of the electricity produced by the solar system.

Net-metering means full retail credit for one’s excess energy; your bill would have it energy usage reduced, and if your usage goes negative, then you get a rollover credit for you next month’s bill. The battle is about the utilities wanting to change this credit on customers’ bills so that it’s lower than the retail rate of electricity. This has started discussions about the concept of “the value of solar” for utilities in many states.

Many utilities were startled after 2012 by the large increase in rooftop solar installations. In many locations this lost revenue was still not significant, but the growth and trends were disturbing.

Utilities are regulated on a stateby-state basis by their respective public utilities commissions, or PUCs.

The first three states to enter into the net-metering battle were California, Arizona and Nevada, due to excellent solar insolation and relatively high electric rates. Earlier this year, in California, the PUC rejected any changes to net-metering, while in Nevada the PUC allowed the utility NV Energy to reduce its credit to customers by 75% reduce how much they credit consumers bills by 75%.

The Nevada decision is still being altered and reviewed, but Solar City, one of the nation’s largest residential installers, has left Nevada due to this PUC decision.

What happens next in the net-metering battle?

Free Market Innovation and Competition

We had an electricity war over 100 years ago – the current wars. This battle was between Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse: Edison wanted a direct current grid, while Westinghouse fought for alternating current. This war was fierce and very public, as the solar wars are becoming today. Nikola Tesla’s patent for the inductive motor was the innovation needed to help decide the “war of the currents.” Inductive motors work with AC, not DC, so when Westinghouse licensed Tesla technology he was able to defeat Edison, and now we have the AC electric grid. Free markets today are helping to decide our solar war about net-metering. This free market competition in the solar industry has brought down the cost of solar-generated electricity to under 3 cents per kwh.

We are seeing innovation in the energy storage space. Remember the typical residential solar system only nets back to the grid about 20-30% of its production. Most of the electricity produced by a solar system is consumed directly in the home. The reason this is important is that to effectively eliminate net-metering back to the grid, you don’t need a lot of storage. Could it be a strange twist of fate that the company called Tesla can use technology, just as the firm’s namesake Nikola Tesla did, to decide this battle in energy?

The short-term impacts of the net-metering battle will adversely affect residential solar installations in the United States. This will happen on a state-by-state basis, depending on the political leanings of each state’s PUC. Here are some of states that are either in, or may soon enter, the net-metering battle: Arizona, Nevada, Maine, Florida, and Alabama.

The biggest short-term loser may be Sun Power due to its exposure to the United States residential market, and its weak cost structure as mentioned in my last article on solar.

The longer term impacts on the solar industry are much more interesting. This net-metering battle is driving innovation in the energy storage and inverter space. Tesla has already announced that it will develop the solar roof and its own inverter/storage technologies. Tesla is buying Solar City, so the combination of the two firms can continue to innovate to eliminate the need for net-metering.

In my opinion within a few years, all residential solar installations will have storage, smart inverter, and curtailment control. In this case with no electricity being passed to the utilities equipment and grid, customers will not even need to notify their utility of their new solar system – or ask for “approval.”

With these longer term impacts in mind, I see this as a positive for several companies: Enphase Energy , Solaredge Technologies, Tesla, and Aquion Energy. All these firms are spending money on research and development on smart energy storage, and have shown to be quite innovative. I do see a technological battle between lithium ion battery and aqueous flow type technology in the near future.

About the Author:
Bill Ellard is an energy economist and consultant, serving businesses, utilities, and municipalities and focusing on distributed generation implementation, solar energy, demand response, demand side management, microgrid development, facility energy management, and renewable energy integration. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

About

  • Welcome to the Arizona Solar Center

     This is your source for solar and renewable energy information in Arizona. Explore various technologies, including photovoltaics, solar water heating, solar architecture, solar cooking and wind power. Keep up to date on the latest industry news. Follow relevant lectures, expositions and tours. Whether you are a homeowner looking to become more energy efficient, a student learning the science behind the technologies or an industry professional, you will find valuable information here.
  • About The Arizona Solar Center

    Arizona Solar Center Mission- The mission of the Arizona Solar Center is to enhance the utilization of renewable energy, educate Arizona's residents on solar technology developments, support commerce and industry in the development of solar and other sustainable technologies and coordinate these efforts throughout the state of Arizona. About the Arizona Solar Center- The Arizona Solar Center (AzSC) provides a broad-based understanding of solar energy, especially as it pertains to Arizona. Registered Read More
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