• New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance

    While there is a growing market for organic solar cells ­­– they contain materials that are cheaper, more abundant, and more environmentally friendly than those used in typical solar panels – they also tend to be less efficient in converting sunlight to electricity than conventional solar cells. Now, scientists who are members of the Center for Computational Study of Excited-State Phenomena in Read more
  • Know Your Rights

    Arizona law protects individual homeowners’ private property rights to solar access by dissolving any local covenant, restriction or condition attached to a property deed that restricts the use of solar energy. This law sustained a legal challenge in 2000. A Maricopa County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of homeowners in a lawsuit filed by their homeowners association seeking to Read more
  • Home Battery Systems

    Rooftop solar panels are common in Arizona thanks to abundant sunshine, but to get even more use from the technology, homeowners are beginning to pair them with large home batteries. Batteries allow homeowners to store their surplus electricity, rather than send it to the grid in exchange for credit from their electric company. Read more
  • Solar Hot Water

    There are two types of solar water heating systems: active, which have circulating pumps and controls, and passive, which don't. The typical solar water heater is comprised of solar collectors and a well-insulated storage tank. The solar collector is a network of pipes that gathers the sun's energy, transforms its radiation into heat, and then transfers that heat to either Read more
  • Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit

    (Information provided by DSIRE - Last reviewed 02/19/2009) Incentive Type: Personal Tax Credit State: Federal Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies: Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Other Solar Electric Technologies Applicable Sectors: Residential Amount: 30% Maximum Incentive: Solar-electric systems placed in service before 2009: $2,000Solar-electric systems placed in service after 2008: no maximumSolar water heaters placed in service before Read more
  • Solar Building Design in Arizona

    The idea of using the sun to meet the energy needs in our buildings has been with us since the time of the Greeks, with some of the design manifestations even evident in the prehistoric structures of Arizona and the Southwest. There is a great historic tradition for Arizona buildings that utilize our most abundant resource, and the current increases Read more
  • How Not to- Battery Connections

    Photo shows the situation after a battery discharge test at 300 amps was terminated on a 1530 AH IBE battery string when one post melted. During the discharge test all cell voltages are logged. The sum of the cell voltages was 2.73 volts lower than the 48-volt string voltage. This is an average of 118 mv per inter-cell connection, 5-10 Read more
  • 1 New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance
  • 2 Know Your Rights
  • 3 Home Battery Systems
  • 4 Solar Hot Water
  • 5 Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit
  • 6 Solar Building Design in Arizona
  • 7 How Not to- Battery Connections

Blogs

  1. Solar Center Blog
  2. Guest Blogs
Lucy Mason
06 January 2018

Wishing you a wonderful and Happy New Year!

The year 2017 has gone by quickly, and AriSEIA has accomplished a full and active agenda to further solar and renewable energy in Arizona. 

Geoff Sutton
25 November 2017

In the desert south-west the intense sunshine and long summer days result in uncomfortable and even dangerously high temperatures for about four months.


Will add Guest Blog content here
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Featured

Some things to pay attention to in Arizona

 
ASEA REBOOT

The Arizona Solar Energy Association (ASEA), State Chapter of the American Solar Energy Society ASES), will be holding meetings in a follow-up to the-long awaited updated ASES‚  Chapters handbook and directives.

ASES evolution, in response to some problematic economic and operational conditions, has resulted in a hearty and robust context for the present and the future. ASEA is now responding with an appropriate updating, through local and statewide discussion. 

Interim Chair, Andy Gerl, a past ASEA Chair and Board member, is making arrangements for Arizona solar advocates and supporters, members and non-members, to receive both an update re: ASES adaptation and changes, and to discuss solar in Arizona and the “reboot" of the ASEA  context, goals and objectives, within the context of varied renewable energy groups within the State, such as AriSEIA (the solar trade association); various sustainability groups; Green Building organizations; the recently formed solar hot water businesses non-profit entity; research and development at the universities; and others.

For more information about the ASEA Reboot discussions, contact Andy at andrew@blazingsolar.com  or 602-799-5942

Upcoming:



Proposition 127  Constitutional Amendment

Arizona 2018 General Election November 6, 2018

 “Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona Amendment.”

A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AMENDING ARTICLE XV OF THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA TO REQUIRE ELECTRICITY PROVIDERS TO GENERATE AT LEAST 50% OF THEIR ANNUAL SALES OF ELECTRICITY FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

There is a lot to this important Proposition and it will have an important affect on solar in Arizona. Television in Arizona seems to have continuous ads against and for this proposition.  Study the issues and vote in November.

Basically the Proposition will place an annual energy requirement on the Arizona utilities:

  1.  EACH AFFECTED UTILITY SHALL BE REQUIRED TO SATISFY AN ANNUAL RENEWABLE ENERGY REQUIREMENT BY OBTAINING RENEWABLE ENERGY CREDITS FROM ELIGIBLE RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES.
  2.  AN AFFECTED UTILITY’S ANNUAL RENEWABLE ENERGY REQUIREMENT SHALL BE CALCULATED EACH CALENDAR YEAR BY APPLYING THE FOLLOWING APPLICABLE ANNUAL PERCENTAGE TO THE RETAIL KWH SOLD BY THE AFFECTED UTILITY DURING THAT CALENDAR YEAR:


(A) IN 2020 NOT LESS THAN   12%  

(B) IN 2021 NOT LESS THAN   14%

(C) IN 2022 NOT LESS THAN  16%

(D) IN 2023 NOT LESS THAN  20%

(E) IN 2024 NOT LESS THAN 24%

(F) IN 2025 NOT LESS THAN 28%

(G) IN 2026 NOT LESS THAN32%

(H) IN 2027 NOT LESS THAN36%

(I) IN 2028 NOT LESS THAN 40%

(J) IN 2029 NOT LESS THAN 45%

(K) 2030 AND EACH YEAR THEREAFTER NOT LESS THAN 50%

The Proposition and For/Against statements are on the Secretary of State website at:https://azsos.gov/sites/default/files/2018_Publicity_Pamphlet_Final.pdf


There is a good discussion of Proposition 127 by Paul Hirt, Arizona State University at:

Renewable Energy Prop 127-In a Nutshell

War On Solar

Arizona Court of Appeals rules no property tax for rooftop solar panels

Thursday (May 18, 2017) the Arizona Court of Appeals ruled that companies leasing rooftop systems to homeowners should not be subjected to a new set of property taxes that the Department of Revenue only recently sought to impose on these businesses.

The ruling upheld a lower court judgment in part and reversed the tax court in part as well. The court ruled the state’s Department of Revenue incorrectly determined in 2013 a leased rooftop solar system should be subject to property tax by misinterpreting the laws that say otherwise.

Rooftop solar companies, SolarCity and SunRun sued the department, arguing the panels were designed primarily for customers’ own on-site consumption, not in the operation of an electric generation facility that sends electricity to customers over transmission and distribution lines.

The Department of Revenue reinterpreted the state’s law in 2013 and started valuing property for taxation for the first time, after thousands of panels had been leased without being assessed for taxation purposes.

From Rose Law Group: Court of Appeals rules no property tax for rooftop solar panels

(Disclosure: Rose Law Group represents one of the taxpayers that prevailed in this ruling.)

Solar Eclipse to Hammer U.S. Grid in August

Put this on your calendar!

The morning of Monday, August 21, 2017, a total eclipse of the sun will occur and is expected to have a dramatic impact on the electric grid in the U.S. The path of totality will extend from South Carolina on the East Coast to Oregon on the West Coast. California's San Juaquin and Coachella valleys, both key solar producing regions, will see coverage of around 76% and 62%, respectively. And, although it will be spared the full impact, California is planning for the potential of major disruptions in its grid as the production of electricity from photovoltaic installations falls from a normal level of over 8,700MW to 5,600MW while demand is rising by 1,300MW primarily due to the increased use of electric lights.

Worse-case estimates by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) predict as much as a 4,200MW reduction in solar generation. Regardless of the actual decrease, the rate of change will be significantly higher than the system was designed to handle and will be a particularly difficult-to-manage problem. The typical ramp rate for the grid at sunrise and sunset is about 29MW per minute. The ramp rate during the eclipse is forecast to be 70MW per minute during the drop off and nearly 100MW per minute during the ending phase of the eclipse.

The rapid return of PV electricity at the end of the eclipse (3X the rate the grid is designed to handle under typical conditions) is expected to be particularly difficult for the grid to absorb without going into an overload condition. As a result, CAISO is working to coordinate a “ramp up plan” that will place limits on how quickly PV power can be ramped up from the peak of the eclipse at about 10:22 a.m. until the end of the eclipse at 11:56 a.m., possibly extending into early afternoon.

Behind-the-meter solar generation will be particularly hard to control and hence its impact will be difficult to estimate. Currently CAISO is obtaining behind the meter solar generation forecasts as well as large scale solar generation forecasts from two forecast service providers. The providers will be producing a forecast accounting for the solar eclipse that will automatically feed through the ISOs daily processes. The aggregate forecast for large scale solar will be available to the market participants, as well as public, through the OASIS applications.

Knowing that the critical information needed to have the most accurate forecast possible will be feeding into the market optimization as well as other processes will assist greatly in optimizing the market with the solar eclipse. In addition to the above some of the additional actions and processes to be followed will include:

  • Reserves procurement: Due to the predicted movement of the transmission connected solar resources CAISO plans to commit an increased amount regulation up and regulation down to assist with the increased ramp rate of the resources. The available regulation resources will be increased to 400MW from the normal level of 250MW.
  • Hydro Generation Usage: Due to the above average hydro year this water season it is expected that come August California will still have availability for hydro to carry regulation and/or energy during the eclipse. CAISO will be working with the hydro community and inform participants of the additional need for flexibility on August 21st due to the eclipse to assist with that flexibility being available to the market optimization.
  • EIM (Energy Imbalance Market) Transfers: The EIM provides a mechanism to share and diversify resources to assist in more enhanced management of the solar eclipse moving across the Western United States. Due to the forecasts for behind the meter and large scale renewable resources being in the market optimization, the EIM transfers will be optimized through the market dispatch. It will be important that all EIM participants account for the solar eclipse effects on their solar renewable resource forecasts in their base schedules that are being submitted by their forecast service providers as well. The Pacificorp EMI is owned by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Energy. Pacific Power (PACW), its western arm, serves electricity customers in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, and California. Rocky Mountain Power (PACE), its eastern arm, serves Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming. Nevada and Arizona operate independently as participants in the Western states EMI.
  • Gas Coordination: CAISO will coordinate with Southern California gas and thermal generators to ensure they have procured enough gas to handle generation deviations during the day of the solar eclipse.
  • Outage Coordination: CAISO will be analyzing the impacts of scheduled generator and transmission outages prior to approving for August 21st.

Future events like the August eclipse have the potential to be even more disastrous. Today, California uses about half of U.S. solar capacity and about 10 percent of the state’s electricity is from PV; enough to power Los Angeles. A new estimate from the U.S. government shows that California met its goal to produce about half the state's electricity from renewable sources for three hours on March 11. The estimate comes from the U.S. Department of Energy's statistics division.

The U.S. Department of Energy's statistics division used data from the CAISO, which manages the electricity grid across 80 percent of California and part of Nevada. The record was set when almost 40 percent of the electricity flowing across the grid came from large-scale solar power plants. Factor in electricity produced by area homes and businesses, and solar met about half the overall electricity demand in the middle of the day. California aims to have 50 percent of all electricity come from renewable sources by 2030.

http://www.powerpulse.net/story.php?storyID=37096

 

Arizona's Renewable Energy Future

The Status of Renewable Resources and Development in Arizona

The following was prepared for and presented to David Garman, Assistant Secretary of Energy of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, at the Southwest Renewable Energy Fair in Flagstaff, Arizona in August 2003.

The presentation summarizes the measurement of renewable resources and the status of their development in Arizona, as well as the effectiveness of the state Environmental Portfolio Standard. The material contained in the presentation was current as of August 2003.

About

  • Welcome to the Arizona Solar Center

     This is your source for solar and renewable energy information in Arizona. Explore various technologies, including photovoltaics, solar water heating, solar architecture, solar cooking and wind power. Keep up to date on the latest industry news. Follow relevant lectures, expositions and tours. Whether you are a homeowner looking to become more energy efficient, a student learning the science behind the technologies or an industry professional, you will find valuable information here.
  • About The Arizona Solar Center

    Arizona Solar Center Mission- The mission of the Arizona Solar Center is to enhance the utilization of renewable energy, educate Arizona's residents on solar technology developments, support commerce and industry in the development of solar and other sustainable technologies and coordinate these efforts throughout the state of Arizona. About the Arizona Solar Center- The Arizona Solar Center (AzSC) provides a broad-based understanding of solar energy, especially as it pertains to Arizona. Registered Read More
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