Recent Updates

The following items have been recently added or updated:

Some Almost Forgotten Solar History

Berkeley Lab’s “Utility-Scale Solar, 2021 Edition”

Electrification of transportation sector = More Renewable Energy Needed

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) to provide 70% of its energy from solar and wind by 2035

A link to a good article on What You Need to Know to make Sure Your Solar Rooftop is Properly Valued at Time of Sale: Is Solar Sexy When You Sell Your Home?

APS- Residential Battery Pilot Program

See the section "Some things to pay attention to in Arizona", click on the various tabs.

Solar Basics (Note- Items below shift Left-Right)

AriSEIA

AriSEIA Files Letter in Support of Community Solar

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May 13, 2022
 
Arizona Corporation Commission
1200 W. Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007
 
RE: Community Solar Support in Docket No. E-01345A-21-0240
 
Madam Chair and Commissioners,

The Arizona Solar Energy Industries Association (AriSEIA) very much supports the Commission in an effort to move forward with community solar. Community solar provides a unique opportunity for residential and small business customers to participate in the clean energy transition when they otherwise would not be able to. Community solar is a useful opportunity for those that cannot utilize rooftop solar for practical or financial reasons to be able to join together in projects that are at strategically valuable locations, still close to distribution opportunities. It also provides a way to utilize otherwise underutilized brownfield and agricultural sites.
 

Events

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 Interesting Arizona Solar Stories

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Interesting Technology Updates -Click on a title below

  • - A radical idea to get a high-renewable electric grid

    This is an interesting approach to optaining very high penetration of renewables such as photovoltaics and wind.  At present most large installations operate under Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) wherein the economics are based on a sell all output at predetermined prices. This contrasts with standalone systems wherein the system size Read More
  • - Breakthrough Batteries Powering the Era of Clean Electrification

    - Breakthrough Batteries Powering the Era of Clean Electrification Battery Storage Costs Drop Dramatically, Making Way to a New Era. A recent Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) report continues to confirm that clean electrification through batteries is advancing at impressive rates. Very interesting report: Breakthrough Batteries- Powering the Era of Clean Electrification Read More
  • - Changes impacting photovoltaic (PV) installations in the 2020 National Electrical Code (NEC)

    - Changes impacting photovoltaic (PV) installations in the 2020 National Electrical Code (NEC) A look at some of the more significant changes under consideration for the 2020 National Electrical Code (NEC) that will affect future distributed generation systems (solar electric wind, etc.). Article 690, Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems and Article 705, being renamed Interconnected Electric Power Production Sources, are specific to distributed generation. Read More
  • - Interesting Technology

    An assortment of links to interesting information   Semiconductor Nanowires Could Double the Efficiency of Silicon Solar Cells A p/n semiconductor junction is not the only way of converting sunshine into useful electrical energy.  Light consists of a flow of photons of various energy levels (colors).  See this article-Solar Cells.  Nanowires Read More
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General News

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Interesting Videos

ASES That's a wrap! 2018 Report


That's a wrap!

As 2018 draws to a close, ASES can reflect on another year of bringing together the solar community though our events and resources. From our new jobs board to Tiny Watts, SOLAR 2018 to the National Solar Tour, our accomplishments are a reflection of the enormous support that we feel from supporters like you. So please accept our sincere gratitude in 2018 as we prepare for even more important work in the weeks and months ahead. We are looking forward to engaging more volunteers to join our community, and an overwhelming increase in solar adoption in 2019.

Earlier this month at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, the United Nations agreed on a common set of rules to put the Paris Agreement into practice. A landmark IPCC report showed we have less than a decade to address global climate change or face catastrophic consequences. It painted a more dire picture of the consequences of climate change than previous research, and this heightens the need for a rapid transformation of the energy economy. The vast majority of the U.N. formally supported the IPCC 1.5˚C report, however the United States only "noted" the report, indicating that it does not endorse its findings.

Though the U.N. science panel chief called for more action to curb climate change (Good COP!), the COP24 outcomes were simply not enough and did not bolster the sense of urgency demanded by the findings. Island countries most vulnerable to climate change, such as Fiji, the Maldives and Vanatu, are expressing deep concern at potential negative outcomes from the negotiations in Poland. At ASES we are bridging solutions and creating the power of community. Please submit a proposal to present at SOLAR 2019, and join us there August 5-9th, in Minneapolis, MN, a city with a commitment to transition to 100% renewable energy by 2030. Please see our call to for participation below to present your solutions. And please join us and give your support today, with a tax deductible donation to ASES.

From the islands to the poles, we are in severe climate danger. Also this month, NOAA published its annual report card on the changing Arctic, describing the north and south poles as increasingly melting as they warm at twice the rate of the global average. With the last five years being the hottest on record, we are "pushing the Arctic into uncharted territory."

It's not too late, and we do have cause to celebrate. Employing more than 250,000 Americans, the U.S. solar energy industry is making our economy stronger and our air cleaner every day. What’s good for the planet is also good for our wallets. 2018 boasted over 18% of net domestic electrical generation from renewable energy sources. More and more individuals, businesses, cities, states, and countries are taking the pledge for 100% renewable energy. Welcome 2019. The future is here. Let’s work together for a clean and clear vision towards 2020.

Wishing you peace and love in your heart and many blessings for a prosperous New Year!
Carly Rixham
Executive Director
American Solar Energy Society

Arizona pro-solar ballot measure fails (after crazy $40 million in spending)

Clean energy advocates Tom Steyer and the NRDC thought they had a winner with Arizona’s Proposition 127, which would have saved consumers money while helping the environment. But a huge burst of negative advertising by a local utility drove the measure down to defeat, while making this the most expensive Arizona election ever at $40 million.

By Charles W. Thurston
Cleantechnica


Proposition 127 required utilities operating in the state to source 50% of their energy from solar, wind, and other renewables. The state renewables energy portfolio standard is now 15% by 2025.
Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona, a group backed by environmental advocate Tom Steyer, filed the proposal as an amendment to the state constitution that would require utilities to increase their renewables generation percentage by about 4% per year starting in 2020, with a minimum of 50% by 2030 and thereafter.

Clean Energy for a Health Arizona identifies itself as “a coalition of organizations and individuals, including Arizona doctors, nurses, labor unions, and small businesses, who know that this measure will improve public health and create good jobs for Arizona.”

Arizona Public Service, the largest utility in the state, opposed the amendment on the grounds that it would force the utility to retire existing non-renewable assets ahead of planned lifetime, stranding assets that might or might not be recoverable from the Arizona Corporation Commission.

APS serves about 2.7 million people in 11 of Arizona’s 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the principal subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

While the utility is relying on new gas plants for its currently filed growth plans, it also has plans for more renewables in the future. APS issued a “peaking capacity” request for proposals in April for approximately 400-800 megawatts of capacity to meet peak demand beginning in 2021, specifically during the months of June through September. “APS will accept proposals for power purchase agreements for delivery to the APS system beginning no later than June 1, 2021,” according to the company RFP. APS also plans to issue other RFPs to solicit forest bioenergy solutions and battery retrofit opportunities for APS-owned solar facilities.

Jeff Deyette, the director of state policy and analysis for the Union of Concerned Scientists, said on November 5, “When Arizonans go to the polls tomorrow they’ll have a tremendous opportunity to take control of their energy future and put the state on the path to a much cleaner, healthier, more affordable power supply.”

Deyette adds “A recent study found that achieving the renewable energy requirements under Proposition 127 could save Arizona consumers as much as $4 billion between 2020 and 2030. That’s because the cost of solar and wind have dropped dramatically to the point where they are cheaper than new investments in fossil fuels, especially in places with strong resources like Arizona.”

The study was commissioned by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and performed by energy analyst ICF. The study found that average electricity bills in 2030 would be $3 a month lower if Arizona pursues a high-renewables future, and $5 a month lower in 2040. The report was based on assumptions provided by NRDC based on publicly-available sources, the organization said.

The Solar Energy Industries Association assesses the solar policy climate in Arizona dimly: “While Arizona solar industry has tremendous growth opportunity, due to public debates about the benefits of solar, imposition of a net metering charge in 2014 and elimination of incentives, the market has been turbulent. SEIA is working with local stakeholders and policy makers to encourage stability and transparency into policies, so that the market can recover from this market disturbance and continue to grow.”

APS already has 10 solar generation plants in the state with a cumulative 1 million solar panels, and overall, 50% of the energy provided to customers is clean energy, including the Palo Verde nuclear station, the utility reports.

Arizona now has 3.6 GW of solar installed at an estimated cost of $8.2 billion, as the state with the third most installed solar generating capacity. About 536,000 homes in Arizona are solar powered, making solar energy the source of about 6% of the state’s total electricity generation by source, according to SEIA.

From http://redgreenandblue.org/2018/11/08/arizona-pro-solar-ballot-measure-fails-crazy-40-million-spending/

Navajo Nation Eyes Utility-Scale Solar with Growing Interest

Momentum is growing around modernizing tribal renewable-energy policies on the Navajo Nation of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah, according to a report published today by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis.

By

The report —“Growing Interest in Developing Navajo Utility-Scale Solar Industry: Policy Momentum and Grassroots Support; Vast Tribal Natural Resource Remains Largely Untapped”— details movement on three fronts:

  • In an evolving tribal utility policy toward more utility-scale solar, a shift driven in part by the success of the Kayenta Solar Facility, a 27.3MW, 200-acre project that came online in 2017 and is now feeding into the regional grid. Kayenta, seen as a pilot for similar initiatives, is also serving as a training ground for large scale solar-installation-and-construction expertise.
  • In central tribal government support for more solar infrastructure in general, including for community-owned solar farms that allow for revenue streams to be shared with local tribal chapters and land owners. Of note on this front: The creation in recent weeks of the Office of Energy Resources and Development.
  • In campaigns to bring community-owned solar projects into locales that have access to key transmission lines and where ownership models are expected to include revenue streams for the Navajo Nation and local tribal chapters alike.

 The emerging interest in utility-scale solar is driven in no small part by the large-scale deployment of solar generation throughout the Southwest, and the report notes how Navajo lands remain something of an island in a growing regional sea of utility-scale solar installations.

Another factor driving the more aggressive pursuit of utility-scale uptake: The likely closure of the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station, a major employer and tax-base component.

The report concedes that a Navajo solar industry could be one building block in a post-coal economy.

“While utility-scale solar is not seen as a replacement for NGS job and revenue losses, it can be a component of a new tribal energy economy that can bring distributed economic benefits and greater energy independence to the region,” said Karl Cates, an IEEFA research editor and author of the report.

On the community-solar front, opportunities are seen now at Cameron, LeChee, and Kayenta. Navajo National officials are modernizing energy policy to help encourage development of more renewables. And NTUA officials say they expect to install more utility-scale solar across their jurisdiction.

Development openings are appearing fast, and the report builds on one previously published by IEEFA and Diné Innovative Network Economies in Hózhó that said:

“As the solar-industry footprint expands, Navajo communities are being courted by outside interests to participate in fast-moving development deals. The Navajo Nation, only 67 years old and built from a history of trauma, is not well-equipped to assess these opportunities, but tribal-chapter communities can get up to speed with proper advice and consultation.”

While few locales in the U.S. are richer in solar potential then the Navajo Nation, few models for utility-scale solar generation exist yet on tribal lands.

You can download the full report for free here: http://ieefa.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Growing-Interest-in-Potential-for-Navajo-Utility-Scale-Solar-Industry.pdf

From https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/11/navajo-nations-eyes-utilityscale-solar-with-growing-interest.html

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  • Welcome to the Arizona Solar Center

     This is your source for solar and renewable energy information in Arizona. Explore various technologies, including photovoltaics, solar water heating, solar architecture, solar cooking and wind power. Keep up to date on the latest industry news. Follow relevant lectures, expositions and tours. Whether you are a homeowner looking to become more energy efficient, a student learning the science behind the technologies or an industry professional, you will find valuable information here.
  • About The Arizona Solar Center

    About The Arizona Solar Center Arizona Solar Center Mission- The mission of the Arizona Solar Center is to enhance the utilization of renewable energy, educate Arizona's residents on solar technology developments, support commerce and industry in the development of solar and other sustainable technologies and coordinate these efforts throughout the state of Arizona. About the Arizona Solar Center- The Arizona Solar Center (AzSC) provides a broad-based understanding of solar energy, especially as it pertains to Arizona. Registered Read More
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